ishallbehealthy:

barbellsandbeakers:

  • Holding onto the treadmill creates a “fake walk” or “fake run” situation. Depending on how you’re distributing your weight onto your hands, you may actually be creating a lighter body load onto your legs. Since your legs hold some of the largest muscles in your body (and, you know, help you walk) cheating them from a good workout is only cheating yourself. 
  • Your arms and shoulders sway in an unnatural fashion to accommodate the new movement, causing unwanted strain. Many chronic treadmill-holder-oners complain of shoulder pain. 
  • You’re cheating your lower back muscles, which typically engage to stabilize your core and keep you upright. 
  • You ruin posture. This is especially true of tall people, or people with short arms. Your body isn’t angled the way it is in the real world, and often you must hunch, lean, or otherwise screw up your posture to compensate.
  • Holding on reinforces improper spinal alignment. Your foot cannot extend fully so you take smaller step lengths. This can cause repetitive stress injuries in your hips.
  • You burn fewer calories (about 20% fewer) by essentially under exerting yourself. We already know the machines suck at counting your calories for you, now you’re making it think you’re engaging multiple muscle groups when really you’re cheating.
  • If working at an incline you’re creating an even more unnatural posture. imagine you’re hiking, or running up a hill…do you unnaturally lean back and hold your arms out in front of you? No. If the incline is at 10% and you’re holding on while leaning back, your body is now at a 10% incline. 
  • You’re cheating your body of balance. The world has many uneven surfaces we often walk on without handlebars in front of you to hold onto.
  • Holding on at fast speeds can raise blood pressure due to the grip plus the speed.

Let go of the handlebars! Walk at an incline that you can maintain, don’t jack it up to impress someone else. You are at the gym for yourself. Pick speeds that you can maintain, don’t hurt yourself trying to show off.

Annoys me when I see people doing this!

nerdyninjanicole:

Even though she grew up playing football, shooting hoops and running races against all the boys in her neighborhood, U.S. 800-meter champion Alysia Montano never wanted to be thought of as one of them.

As a result, she started wearing a flower behind her right ear to remind the boys they were getting beat by a girl.

“The flower to me means strength with femininity. I think that a lot of people say things like you run like a girl. That doesn’t mean you have to run soft or you have to run dainty. It means that you’re strong.”

(Source)

Running Up Hills!

Nothing builds running strength better than hills. Running inclines forces your muscles to work harder with each step; as you grow stronger, your stride becomes more efficient and your overall speed improves. Despite the benefits, many newcomers (and old-timers) avoid hills–after all, defying gravity can be physically and mentally uncomfortable. But simple form adjustments and a go-slow approach can reduce the challenges and boost your fitness. 

Maintain good form-> As you ascend, shorten your stride and keep your feet low to the ground. Try to keep your head, chest, and hips perpendicular to an imaginary horizontal line. On descents, take short, quick, light steps and keep your center of gravity over your legs.

Start easy-> For your first hill workout, jog for 10 minutes to warm up, then walk for two minutes. From the bottom of a gentle incline, run up at an easy pace for five seconds, then walk back to the starting point. Run up again for seven seconds. Walk down. Run for 10 seconds, then walk down. If you’re feeling strong, repeat the sequence. Cool down with a 15-minute jog. 

Progress slowly-> Do the Start Easy workout several times, then ramp it up. Perform 2 x 10 seconds–run up for 10 seconds, then walk down and repeat. Then do 2 x 15, followed by 2 x 20. On your next hill workout, repeat the sequence twice and finish with a 30-second run. 

Stick with it-> Schedule a hill run every seven to 14 days. As you get stronger, add time to your segments and/or add an additional hill until you’re running 10 inclines. If you’re training for a hilly race, try to mimic in your workouts the types of hills you’ll encounter in your race. When motivation lags, run hills with a buddy and take turns leading the upward charge.

Running Shoe FAQ

Q: How snug should a running shoe fit?

A: You should have a thumbnail’s length of extra space in the toebox. This helps you avoid losing toenails since your toes won’t jam against the end when running downhill or when your feet swell. The width should be snug but allow a bit of room for your foot to move without rubbing. Laces should be snug but not tight.

Q: What is the typical lifespan of a running shoe?

A: In general, a pair of running shoes should last between 300 to 500 miles of running (3 or 4 months for regular runners). This varies depending on your running mechanics. Take a look at your shoes. While the uppers will often look good, check the midsole and outsoles to see if they are compressed or worn.

Q: If I wear an orthotic to correct my pronation, do I still need a motion-control shoe?

A: You may be OK with a neutral shoe, but a motion-control shoe offers the most additional support.

Q: Can I use a road shoe for running trails?

A: Absolutely, just keep in mind that a trail shoe will give you more traction on rough or loose surfaces than a road shoe.

Q: If I supinate, can I wear a shoe that is for overpronators?

A: You shouldn’t. It’s best to go with the shoe that coordinates with your body mechanics to avoid any injuries.

Q: Is it OK to do a race or long run while wearing new shoes?

A: The best approach is to do a short run first to see how your new shoes feel. You want to make sure the shoe is right for you before hitting a trail or pounding the pavement in a race.

Via
Canon EOS REBEL T3

Tips for running on the beach!

If you’re hitting the beach this Summer because you’re lucky enough to live close to one or you’re vacationing near the ocean, do more than collect shells in the sand. That soft, granular surface offers excellent resistance, so it’s not only an inexpensive way to keep up with your workouts, but walking or running on sand burns about 30 percent more calories than you would on a harder surface such as asphalt. Here are some tips to get the most our of your workout.

  • Choose your shoes: You don’t need a specific type for beach running, but try to dedicate one pair of running shoes for beach runs so you don’t have to attempt the nearly impossible task of removing all the sand after your workout.
  • Or go barefoot. Going without shoes allows you to use your toes to grip the ground, so it’s great for the muscles in your feet and calves. Just be careful because running on uneven surfaces can increase the risk of sprains and tendonitis, not to mention cuts and puncture wounds from broken shells and glass. Choose the flattest, cleanest surface you can find. Ease into barefoot running by starting off walking, and gradually move to running to avoid straining your muscles.
  • Start on wet sand: Do your first beach run on the wet, firm sand near the water. Do alternating intervals of running on the softer sand for one to two-minute intervals, then switch to walking on the hard, wet sand for three to five minutes to recover. Stick with short runs totaling 15 or 20 minutes until you adapt to the soft sand.
  • Don’t expect to run at your usual pace. Hitting the sand is much more challenging than pounding pavement or a treadmill, so you’ll need to slow down your speed until you build up strength and endurance.
  • Protect yourself from UV rays. Running on the beach offers no protection from the sun, so lube up on a broad-spectrum sunscreen, or you may prefer to wear a lightweight long-sleeve shirt if you’re especially prone to sunburns. A hat will shade your face and neck, and sunglasses will protect your eyes from the glare of the sun’s reflection on the water.
  • Finish barefoot: Post-run, take off your shoes and cool down by walking barefoot on the beach for a few minutes to strengthen your feet and ankles. Sand is a great exfoliator, too, so it’s like you’re getting a natural pedicure.
fitspoholic:

Too early to quit! New wallpaper <3 Enjoy
More Fitspo Wallpapers here

fitspoholic:

Too early to quit! New wallpaper <3 Enjoy

More Fitspo Wallpapers here

muffintop-less:

“With my HIIT, I do like 1 minute of sprints and then 2 minutes of jogging. Is this ok or should I change something?”
Technically that would be considered interval training, but not HIIT. With HIIT… the intensity of the sprint needs to be significantly more intense. Think all-out, maximum effort. Not even Olympic-level athletes can sprint at their maximum intensity for a full minute!You should be pushing yourself hard enough that you can only do whatever it is your doing for 30 seconds TOPS. The 2 minute jog following that sprint is fine! In time as your fitness level improves, you can decrease the rest time which will create a more challenging HIIT workout. So remember, HIIT is maximum effort followed by a brief rest period (usually 1-2 minutes). That cycle is then repeated somewhere around 5-7 times. Simply increasing your intensity slightly for a minute or so is interval training but does not constitute HIIT. 

muffintop-less:

“With my HIIT, I do like 1 minute of sprints and then 2 minutes of jogging. Is this ok or should I change something?”

Technically that would be considered interval training, but not HIIT. With HIIT… the intensity of the sprint needs to be significantly more intense. Think all-out, maximum effort. Not even Olympic-level athletes can sprint at their maximum intensity for a full minute!
You should be pushing yourself hard enough that you can only do whatever it is your doing for 30 seconds TOPS. The 2 minute jog following that sprint is fine! In time as your fitness level improves, you can decrease the rest time which will create a more challenging HIIT workout. 
So remember, HIIT is maximum effort followed by a brief rest period (usually 1-2 minutes). That cycle is then repeated somewhere around 5-7 times. Simply increasing your intensity slightly for a minute or so is interval training but does not constitute HIIT. 

Run!

fitnessgifs4u:

General Strength exercises for runners. Part one includes the Pedestal Routine and the Myrtl routine. These two routines should be done following your running workout. The Myrtl routine gets its name because it focuses on your hip girdle. All the exercises in this routine either strengthen or help provide a greater range of motion in this area.
fitnessgifs4u:

General Strength exercises for runners. Part one includes the Pedestal Routine and the Myrtl routine. These two routines should be done following your running workout. The Myrtl routine gets its name because it focuses on your hip girdle. All the exercises in this routine either strengthen or help provide a greater range of motion in this area.
fitnessgifs4u:

General Strength exercises for runners. Part one includes the Pedestal Routine and the Myrtl routine. These two routines should be done following your running workout. The Myrtl routine gets its name because it focuses on your hip girdle. All the exercises in this routine either strengthen or help provide a greater range of motion in this area.
fitnessgifs4u:

General Strength exercises for runners. Part one includes the Pedestal Routine and the Myrtl routine. These two routines should be done following your running workout. The Myrtl routine gets its name because it focuses on your hip girdle. All the exercises in this routine either strengthen or help provide a greater range of motion in this area.
fitnessgifs4u:

General Strength exercises for runners. Part one includes the Pedestal Routine and the Myrtl routine. These two routines should be done following your running workout. The Myrtl routine gets its name because it focuses on your hip girdle. All the exercises in this routine either strengthen or help provide a greater range of motion in this area.
fitnessgifs4u:

General Strength exercises for runners. Part one includes the Pedestal Routine and the Myrtl routine. These two routines should be done following your running workout. The Myrtl routine gets its name because it focuses on your hip girdle. All the exercises in this routine either strengthen or help provide a greater range of motion in this area.
fitnessgifs4u:

General Strength exercises for runners. Part one includes the Pedestal Routine and the Myrtl routine. These two routines should be done following your running workout. The Myrtl routine gets its name because it focuses on your hip girdle. All the exercises in this routine either strengthen or help provide a greater range of motion in this area.
fitnessgifs4u:

General Strength exercises for runners. Part one includes the Pedestal Routine and the Myrtl routine. These two routines should be done following your running workout. The Myrtl routine gets its name because it focuses on your hip girdle. All the exercises in this routine either strengthen or help provide a greater range of motion in this area.

fitnessgifs4u:

General Strength exercises for runners. Part one includes the Pedestal Routine and the Myrtl routine. These two routines should be done following your running workout. The Myrtl routine gets its name because it focuses on your hip girdle. All the exercises in this routine either strengthen or help provide a greater range of motion in this area.

Awesome Advice For Beginner Runners!

undressedskeleton:

Awesome Advice For Beginner Runners!