Harris Benedict Equation for Calculating Caloric Needs (As seen in the Insanity Program)

Women

  • 655 + (4.35 x weight in pounds) + (4.7 x height in inches) - (4.7 x age in years)

Men

  • 66 + (6.23 x weight in pounds) + (12.7 x height in inches) - (6.8 x age in years)

Take the number from your equation and multiply it by one of these numbers depending on your activity level.

  • 1.2 - Sedentary, Little or No Exercise
  • 1.375 - Lightly Active, Light Exercise (1-3 days a week)
  • 1.55 - Moderatly Active, Moderate Exercise (3-5 days a week)
  • 1.77 - Very Active, Hard Exercise (6-7 days a week)
  • 1.9 - Extremely Active, Hard Daily Exercise and/or a Physical Job

These are your calories needed to maintain your weight. If you want to gain weight, add 500 calories. Similarly, if you want to lose weight, subtract 500 calories.

The best way to go about breaking up your meals is to divide your new number by 5 to get the approximate amount for each meal. Eating 5 times a day keeps your metabolism going. I find this very effective and rarely get hungry unless I miss one of my meals. 

Example time!

  • 655 + (4.35 x 150lbs) + (4.7 x 66in) - (4.7 x 19yr)
  • 665 + 652.5 + 310.2 - 89.3
  • 1,538.4 (This is the minimum of what my body needs to function.)
  • I’m lightly active so I’m going to multiply 1,538.4 by 1.375
  • 2,115.3 (This is how many calories to maintain.)
  • I want to lose weight so I will subtract 500
  • 1615.3 is my personal daily target
  • Divided by 5, each of my meals are around 323.

If you are struggling with eating plans, give this a go. I have no bad things to say about it yet.

Try it out and share your successes or complications!

muffintop-less:

Cravings Could Be Defeated with Two Little Words
Why is it that we crave chocolate chip cookies rather than chard? Or bread instead of broccoli? Take heart: It’s biological.
“Our attraction to sweets — and salt, carbohydrates and fat — is hard-wired from the Stone Age,” says Dr. David Katz, director of Yale University’s Prevention Research Center. Back then, food cravings were reliable signals to our ancestors to seek out certain foods that would provide energy (sugar, fat) and essential minerals (salt).
“Today, food is plentiful and it’s easy to avoid physical activity, but we’ve preserved craving tendencies because evolution is very slow,” Katz says. And cravings are just one more reason that obesity is an epidemic in this country. So is there anything you can do to fight these deep-rooted desires?
For starters, try a reframing exercise that seems to work for all sorts of yearnings. It’s actually pretty easy: When deciding whether to eat something that isn’t necessarily nutritious, use the words “I don’t” instead of “I can’t.”
What’s the difference? “With ‘I don’t’ you’re choosing words that signal empowerment and determination rather than ones that signal deprivation,” says Vanessa Patrick, an associate professor of marketing at the University of Houston. In four studies, Patrick and her colleagues examined how “empowered refusal” can increase feelings of control and self-awareness, especially with food. They found that when it came to deciding whether to eat certain foods, saying “I don’t” was nearly three times as effective as saying “no” and about eight times more effective than saying “I can’t.” The research was published in March’s Journal of Consumer Research.
Read on for explanations about why we crave certain foods and why we should just say “I don’t.” - http://www.latimes.com/health/la-he-cravings-20120721,0,7652489.story

muffintop-less:

Cravings Could Be Defeated with Two Little Words

Why is it that we crave chocolate chip cookies rather than chard? Or bread instead of broccoli? Take heart: It’s biological.

“Our attraction to sweets — and salt, carbohydrates and fat — is hard-wired from the Stone Age,” says Dr. David Katz, director of Yale University’s Prevention Research Center. Back then, food cravings were reliable signals to our ancestors to seek out certain foods that would provide energy (sugar, fat) and essential minerals (salt).

“Today, food is plentiful and it’s easy to avoid physical activity, but we’ve preserved craving tendencies because evolution is very slow,” Katz says. And cravings are just one more reason that obesity is an epidemic in this country. So is there anything you can do to fight these deep-rooted desires?

For starters, try a reframing exercise that seems to work for all sorts of yearnings. It’s actually pretty easy: When deciding whether to eat something that isn’t necessarily nutritious, use the words “I don’t” instead of “I can’t.”

What’s the difference? “With ‘I don’t’ you’re choosing words that signal empowerment and determination rather than ones that signal deprivation,” says Vanessa Patrick, an associate professor of marketing at the University of Houston. In four studies, Patrick and her colleagues examined how “empowered refusal” can increase feelings of control and self-awareness, especially with food. They found that when it came to deciding whether to eat certain foods, saying “I don’t” was nearly three times as effective as saying “no” and about eight times more effective than saying “I can’t.” The research was published in March’s Journal of Consumer Research.

Read on for explanations about why we crave certain foods and why we should just say “I don’t.” - http://www.latimes.com/health/la-he-cravings-20120721,0,7652489.story

muffintop-less:

15 Health Benefits of Eating Apples
Many of us forget that sometimes, the simplest answers are the best. Better health could be as easy as reaching for the fruit bowl for some apples next time you need a snack 
What makes apples so great?
In 2004, USDA scientists investigated over 100 foods to measure their antioxidant concentration per serving size.Two apples—Red Delicious and Granny Smith—ranked 12th and 13th respectively. Antioxidantsare disease-fighting compounds. Scientists believe these compounds help prevent and repair oxidation damage that happens during normal cell activity. Apples are also full of a fibre called pectin—a medium-sized apple contains about 4 grams of fibre. Pectin is classed as a soluble, fermentable and viscous fibre, a combination that gives it a huge list of health benefits.
1. Get whiter, healthier teeth An apple won’t replace your toothbrush, but biting and chewing an apple stimulates the production of saliva in your mouth, reducing tooth decay by lowering the levels of bacteria.
2. Avoid Alzheimer’s A new study performed on mice shows that drinking apple juice could keep Alzheimer’s away and fight the effects of aging on the brain. Mice in the study that were fed an apple-enhanced diet showed higher levels of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine and did better in maze tests than those on a regular diet.
3. Protect against Parkinson’s Research has shown that people who eat fruits and other high-fibre foods gain a certain amount of protection against Parkinson’s, a disease characterized by a breakdown of the brain’s dopamine-producing nerve cells. Scientists have linked this to the free radical-fighting power of the antioxidants contained therein.
4. Curb all sorts of cancers Scientists from the American Association for Cancer Research, among others, agree that the consumption of flavonol-rich apples could help reduce your risk of developing pancreatic cancer by up to 23 per cent. Researchers at Cornell University have identified several compounds—triterpenoids—in apple peel that have potent anti-growth activities against cancer cells in the liver, colon and breast. Their earlier research found that extracts from whole apples can reduce the number and size of mammary tumours in rats. Meanwhile, the National Cancer Institute in the U.S. has recommended a high fibre intake to reduce the risk of colorectal cancer.
5. Decrease your risk of diabetes Women who eat at least one apple a day are 28 percent less likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those who don’t eat apples. Apples are loaded with soluble fibre, the key to blunting blood sugar swings.
6. Reduce cholesterol The soluble fibre found in apples binds with fats in the intestine, which translates intolower cholesterol levels and a healthier you.
7. Get a healthier heart An extensive body of research has linked high soluble fibre intake with a slower buildup of cholesterol-rich plaque in your arteries. The phenolic compound found in apple skins also prevents the cholesterol that gets into your system from solidifying on your artery walls. When plaque builds inside your arteries, it reduces blood flow to your heart, leading to coronary artery disease.
8. Prevent gallstones Gallstones form when there’s too much cholesterol in your bile for it to remain as a liquid, so it solidifies. They are particularly prevalent in the obese. To prevent gallstones, doctors recommend a diet high in fibre to help you control your weight and cholesterol levels.
9. Beat diarrhea and constipation Whether you can’t go to the bathroom or you just can’t stop, fibre found in apples can help. Fibre can either pull water out of your colon to keep things moving along when you’re backed up, or absorb excess water from your stool to slow your bowels down.
10. Neutralize irritable bowel syndrome Irritable bowel syndrome is characterized by constipation, diarrhea, and abdominal pain and bloating. To control these symptoms doctors recommend staying away from dairy and fatty foods while including a high intake of fibre in your diet.
11. Avert hemorrhoids Hemorrhoids are a swollen vein in the anal canal and while not life threatening, these veins can be very painful. They are caused by too much pressure in the pelvic and rectal areas. Part and parcel with controlling constipation, fibre can prevent you from straining too much when going to the bathroom and thereby help alleviate hemorrhoids.
12. Control your weight Many health problems are associated with being overweight, among them heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes and sleep apnea. To manage your weight and improve your overall health, doctors recommend a diet rich in fibre. Foods high in fibre will fill you up without costing you too many calories.
13. Detoxify your liver We’re constantly consuming toxins, whether it is from drinks or food, and your liver is responsible for clearing these toxins out of your body. Many doctors are skeptical of fad detox diets, saying they have the potential to do more harm than good. Luckily, one of the best—and easiest—things you can eat to help detoxify your liver is fruits—like apples.
14. Boost your immune system Red apples contain an antioxidant called quercetin. Recent studies have found thatquercetin can help boost and fortify your immune system, especially when you’re stressed out.
15. Prevent cataracts Though past studies have been divided on the issue, recent long-term studies suggest that people who have a diet rich in fruits that contain antioxidants—like apples—are 10 to 15 per cent less likely to develop cataracts.
Full Article

muffintop-less:

15 Health Benefits of Eating Apples

Many of us forget that sometimes, the simplest answers are the best. Better health could be as easy as reaching for the fruit bowl for some apples next time you need a snack
 

What makes apples so great?

In 2004, USDA scientists investigated over 100 foods to measure their antioxidant concentration per serving size.Two apples—Red Delicious and Granny Smith—ranked 12th and 13th respectivelyAntioxidantsare disease-fighting compounds. Scientists believe these compounds help prevent and repair oxidation damage that happens during normal cell activity. Apples are also full of a fibre called pectin—a medium-sized apple contains about 4 grams of fibre. Pectin is classed as a soluble, fermentable and viscous fibre, a combination that gives it a huge list of health benefits.

  • 1. Get whiter, healthier teeth An apple won’t replace your toothbrush, but biting and chewing an apple stimulates the production of saliva in your mouth, reducing tooth decay by lowering the levels of bacteria.
  • 2. Avoid Alzheimer’s A new study performed on mice shows that drinking apple juice could keep Alzheimer’s away and fight the effects of aging on the brain. Mice in the study that were fed an apple-enhanced diet showed higher levels of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine and did better in maze tests than those on a regular diet.
  • 3. Protect against Parkinson’s Research has shown that people who eat fruits and other high-fibre foods gain a certain amount of protection against Parkinson’s, a disease characterized by a breakdown of the brain’s dopamine-producing nerve cells. Scientists have linked this to the free radical-fighting power of the antioxidants contained therein.
  • 4. Curb all sorts of cancers Scientists from the American Association for Cancer Research, among others, agree that the consumption of flavonol-rich apples could help reduce your risk of developing pancreatic cancer by up to 23 per cent. Researchers at Cornell University have identified several compounds—triterpenoids—in apple peel that have potent anti-growth activities against cancer cells in the liver, colon and breast. Their earlier research found that extracts from whole apples can reduce the number and size of mammary tumours in rats. Meanwhile, the National Cancer Institute in the U.S. has recommended a high fibre intake to reduce the risk of colorectal cancer.
  • 5. Decrease your risk of diabetes Women who eat at least one apple a day are 28 percent less likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those who don’t eat apples. Apples are loaded with soluble fibre, the key to blunting blood sugar swings.
  • 6. Reduce cholesterol The soluble fibre found in apples binds with fats in the intestine, which translates intolower cholesterol levels and a healthier you.
  • 7. Get a healthier heart An extensive body of research has linked high soluble fibre intake with a slower buildup of cholesterol-rich plaque in your arteries. The phenolic compound found in apple skins also prevents the cholesterol that gets into your system from solidifying on your artery walls. When plaque builds inside your arteries, it reduces blood flow to your heart, leading to coronary artery disease.
  • 8. Prevent gallstones Gallstones form when there’s too much cholesterol in your bile for it to remain as a liquid, so it solidifies. They are particularly prevalent in the obese. To prevent gallstones, doctors recommend a diet high in fibre to help you control your weight and cholesterol levels.
  • 9. Beat diarrhea and constipation Whether you can’t go to the bathroom or you just can’t stop, fibre found in apples can help. Fibre can either pull water out of your colon to keep things moving along when you’re backed up, or absorb excess water from your stool to slow your bowels down.
  • 10. Neutralize irritable bowel syndrome Irritable bowel syndrome is characterized by constipation, diarrhea, and abdominal pain and bloating. To control these symptoms doctors recommend staying away from dairy and fatty foods while including a high intake of fibre in your diet.
  • 11. Avert hemorrhoids Hemorrhoids are a swollen vein in the anal canal and while not life threatening, these veins can be very painful. They are caused by too much pressure in the pelvic and rectal areas. Part and parcel with controlling constipation, fibre can prevent you from straining too much when going to the bathroom and thereby help alleviate hemorrhoids.
  • 12. Control your weight Many health problems are associated with being overweight, among them heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes and sleep apnea. To manage your weight and improve your overall health, doctors recommend a diet rich in fibre. Foods high in fibre will fill you up without costing you too many calories.
  • 13. Detoxify your liver We’re constantly consuming toxins, whether it is from drinks or food, and your liver is responsible for clearing these toxins out of your body. Many doctors are skeptical of fad detox diets, saying they have the potential to do more harm than good. Luckily, one of the best—and easiest—things you can eat to help detoxify your liver is fruits—like apples.
  • 14. Boost your immune system Red apples contain an antioxidant called quercetin. Recent studies have found thatquercetin can help boost and fortify your immune system, especially when you’re stressed out.
  • 15. Prevent cataracts Though past studies have been divided on the issue, recent long-term studies suggest that people who have a diet rich in fruits that contain antioxidants—like apples—are 10 to 15 per cent less likely to develop cataracts.

Full Article

wishing-4-perfection:

Exercises that activate each buttocks muscle : 
MEDIUS - Jumping Jacks 
MAXIMUS - Deep Lunges 
MINIMUS - Squats
Honestly, you need NOTHING else to get the butt you dream of, just these three exercises!

wishing-4-perfection:

Exercises that activate each buttocks muscle : 

  • MEDIUS - Jumping Jacks 
  • MAXIMUS - Deep Lunges 
  • MINIMUS - Squats

Honestly, you need NOTHING else to get the butt you dream of, just these three exercises!

Are you eating the rainbow? (And I don’t mean Skittles!)

Make sure that your meals don’t consist of 3 or 4 shades of brown. When I eat at home with my family, there was literally no color to the meals. Instant mashed potatoes, corn, breaded fish, pasta, etc. Try to make sure you eat at least 3 different colors each meal. Incorporate fresh produce to make your meals delicious and healthy!

-Nicole

ishallbehealthy:

barbellsandbeakers:

  • Holding onto the treadmill creates a “fake walk” or “fake run” situation. Depending on how you’re distributing your weight onto your hands, you may actually be creating a lighter body load onto your legs. Since your legs hold some of the largest muscles in your body (and, you know, help you walk) cheating them from a good workout is only cheating yourself. 
  • Your arms and shoulders sway in an unnatural fashion to accommodate the new movement, causing unwanted strain. Many chronic treadmill-holder-oners complain of shoulder pain. 
  • You’re cheating your lower back muscles, which typically engage to stabilize your core and keep you upright. 
  • You ruin posture. This is especially true of tall people, or people with short arms. Your body isn’t angled the way it is in the real world, and often you must hunch, lean, or otherwise screw up your posture to compensate.
  • Holding on reinforces improper spinal alignment. Your foot cannot extend fully so you take smaller step lengths. This can cause repetitive stress injuries in your hips.
  • You burn fewer calories (about 20% fewer) by essentially under exerting yourself. We already know the machines suck at counting your calories for you, now you’re making it think you’re engaging multiple muscle groups when really you’re cheating.
  • If working at an incline you’re creating an even more unnatural posture. imagine you’re hiking, or running up a hill…do you unnaturally lean back and hold your arms out in front of you? No. If the incline is at 10% and you’re holding on while leaning back, your body is now at a 10% incline. 
  • You’re cheating your body of balance. The world has many uneven surfaces we often walk on without handlebars in front of you to hold onto.
  • Holding on at fast speeds can raise blood pressure due to the grip plus the speed.

Let go of the handlebars! Walk at an incline that you can maintain, don’t jack it up to impress someone else. You are at the gym for yourself. Pick speeds that you can maintain, don’t hurt yourself trying to show off.

Annoys me when I see people doing this!

Running Up Hills!

Nothing builds running strength better than hills. Running inclines forces your muscles to work harder with each step; as you grow stronger, your stride becomes more efficient and your overall speed improves. Despite the benefits, many newcomers (and old-timers) avoid hills–after all, defying gravity can be physically and mentally uncomfortable. But simple form adjustments and a go-slow approach can reduce the challenges and boost your fitness. 

Maintain good form-> As you ascend, shorten your stride and keep your feet low to the ground. Try to keep your head, chest, and hips perpendicular to an imaginary horizontal line. On descents, take short, quick, light steps and keep your center of gravity over your legs.

Start easy-> For your first hill workout, jog for 10 minutes to warm up, then walk for two minutes. From the bottom of a gentle incline, run up at an easy pace for five seconds, then walk back to the starting point. Run up again for seven seconds. Walk down. Run for 10 seconds, then walk down. If you’re feeling strong, repeat the sequence. Cool down with a 15-minute jog. 

Progress slowly-> Do the Start Easy workout several times, then ramp it up. Perform 2 x 10 seconds–run up for 10 seconds, then walk down and repeat. Then do 2 x 15, followed by 2 x 20. On your next hill workout, repeat the sequence twice and finish with a 30-second run. 

Stick with it-> Schedule a hill run every seven to 14 days. As you get stronger, add time to your segments and/or add an additional hill until you’re running 10 inclines. If you’re training for a hilly race, try to mimic in your workouts the types of hills you’ll encounter in your race. When motivation lags, run hills with a buddy and take turns leading the upward charge.

Love yourself!

Quick tip #1 for being healthier!

Skip the gallons of butter and mounds of salt on your corn on the cob! You’ll appreciate the flavor and sweetness more and skip all the fat and sodium!

Panera Pantry Essentials Checklist!

Click here for the printable PDF so you can always have it with you!

probodyconfidence:

The Food Doctor Principles.